Picking Up Your Dog

 


Per State Law – All of our Dogs/Puppies are quarantined in our foster system.  Direct adopts from any transport is illegal in the State of Maine, New Hamsphire and Massachusettts.

Picking up from our foster homes as directed by your adoption coordinator:

YOU MUST BRING WITH YOU:

Printed Paypal receipts for all adopters.

Collar with Tags with your name and phone number.

  • A martingale collar or harness is best.  A slip leash is another good alternative for pick up but not for the long term.  
  • Do NOT bring: Chain Choke collars or flexi-leashes. Do not use flexi-leashes at home for at least 3 months (we do not ever recommend them), as they can be chewed through in 2 seconds and are dangerous.

CRATE: For the sake of your car, dogs should be crated securely when you are bringing them home.  They also may have a temporary case of nervous nausea, vomiting or diarrhea.

VIGILANCE: Be extremely vigilant after picking up your new family member, and when you first bring your dog home:  these dogs are stressed and can slip a collar easily  and can be extreme flight risks, even after you get them home. Remember!  They don’t know where they live yet.

LOTS OF LOVE! Your new dog needs lots of love, hugs, acceptance and patience!

WHAT TO HAVE FOR THE HOMECOMING OF YOUR NEW DOG:

Dog Shampoo:  Your dog will already be Frontlined, therefore your dog can and should be bathed.

High Quality Food:  Shelter dogs need the nutrients of a good food to help their lowered and stressed immune systems and to recover and maintain general good health.

An Immediate Appointment with your Vet:  All dogs need to see the vet for a baseline health exam. They also need:

  • Re-worming (Panacure or Drontal Plus for Southern dogs..do not re-worm with Strongid, it does NOT kill all the common southern worms/parasites).
  • HEARTGARD! Consistent Heartgard for a full year, all year! See below.
  • Lyme Vaccine: There is no cure for Lyme disease and it is a serious problem in the Northeast!

Register your microchip as soon as you get home!!

  • 75-80% of dogs that accidentally get loose are NEVER returned to their owners. Please be responsible for keeping your dog safe at all times.  If your dog does get lost, registering the microchip gives your dog a better chance of being returned to you.

IMPORTANT TIPS:

Do not overwhelm your new dog with strangers, children and chaos. Let your dog adjust to its new family and schedule for a few weeks before going visiting and out in public. Please keep the phone number of your coordinator handy at all times. Call us if you have an issue or your dog gets loose. MANY rescue dogs get loose because people underestimate the trauma a dog is experiencing when changing environments. Things you can do to reduce the chances of a lost dog:

  • Keep your dog on a harness with a leash attached at all times for a week after transport.
  • Be extra vigilant. Flight risk is the highest during the first few weeks in its new home.
  • Leash your new dog whenever it is outside or near the door. Or whenever you have children using the door.
  • Do not try to “test” your new dog off-leash. Buy a 25ft check cord from the pet store (not a flexi leash!!) to test your dogs recall or go to a large fenced in dog park.
  • Take your dog to formal obedience training. A dog that is well-trained is much less likely to be lost or hit by a car and very likely to become a well adjusted, well mannered dog.
  •  If your dog gets loose, DON’T GIVE CHASE and don’t PANIC! Kneel down and calmly call the dog. Please call us immediately and see our download on how to recover a lost dog.

THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOR:
Dogs may have diarrhea and stomach upset because of a change in diet.    Please do not feed your new dog inexpensive food (Pedigree/Purina/Ol’ Roy), it will hurt their already stressed digestive systems and will not give them the nutrients needed to recover from their shelter life and transport.

BE CONCERNED IF:  Diarrhea persists for more than 2 days, OR sooner if it has blood mixed in with it. Please contact your coordinator. These dogs are wormed, however the stress of transport, foster home and now your home can suppress the immune system, meaning latent worms in their system can grow unrestrained.  OR, your dog may need a bland transitional diet. DO NOT start your dog on a bland diet with out checking for worms first. Worms and parasites can cause dehydration and CAN kill a puppy if left untreated.  A fecal float done by your vet is inexpensive and should diagnose worms or parasites in the system.

INFORMATION ON HEARTWORM PREVENTATIVE:
HEARTGARD/INTERCEPTOR is REQUIRED for all dogs and puppies from arrival for a FULL YEAR continuously, then according to your vets recommendation and schedule. This requirement is due to the dogs exposure to a high number of heartworm positive dogs in the south. If you do NOT use heartworm preventative for a full year, your dog could potentially become heartworm positive. It takes 7 months from exposure to a positive test, so if you use a heartworm preventative during this amount of time after your dog’s arrival, any exposure should be negated by the preventative.   The treatment for heartworm is painful to the dog and has associated risks.  

OUR RESCUE DOES NOT ACCEPT THE LIABILITY, NOR ANY COSTS, FOR TREATMENT OF A POSITIVE DOG IF THE DOG WAS TOO YOUNG TO TEST (UNDER 6 MONTHS) OR TESTED HEARTWORM NEGATIVE JUST PRIOR TO BEING TRANSPORTED NORTH…PLEASE USE PREVENTATIVE!  UNTREATED HEARTWORM DISEASE WILL KILL A DOG.